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Post-Tib Tendonitis

Glossary of Podiatric Terms

Achilles Tendonitis

Arch Pain / Arch Strain

Arthritis

Athlete's Foot

Bunions (Bunionettes)

Calluses

Claw Toes

Corns

The Diabetic Foot

Hammer Toes

Heel Fissures (Cracked Heels)

Heel Pain

Heel Spurs

Ingrown Toenails

Mallet Toes

Metatarsalgia

Mortons Neuroma

Mortons Toe

Neuropathy

Overlapping Toes

Over Pronation (Flat Feet)

Plantar Fasciitis

Post-Tib Tendonitis

Definition

Post-Tib Tendonitis is a strain placed on the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon runs along the inside of the ankle and the foot. When there is post-tibial tendon dysfunction, the tendon does not function to hold up the arch, resulting in flat feet. This can lead to heel pain, arch pain, plantar fasciitis and/or heel spurs. With post-tib tendonitis, pain will be more severe upon weight bearing, especially while walking or running.

Cause

Post-Tib Tendonitis occurs when the muscle is overused and the tendon (soft tissue) that connects the muscle to your bone is strained. Years of over-pronation (flat feet) can also lead to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. If you keep overusing the muscle, damage to the tendon builds up and tendonitis develops. At first the pain or swelling may come and go quickly, but eventually the problem may become more permanent.

Treatment and Prevention

To treat post-tib tendonitis, you can reduce your symptoms by limiting activity to control the pain and swelling. Stay off your feet a few days, and then slowly increase your activity. Rest allows the tissues in your foot to heal.

Conservative treatments (non-surgical treatments) include wearing a foot orthotic with rear foot posting and longitudinal arch support to reduce strain on the post tibial tendon and prevent excessive stretching of the plantar fascia. The orthotic should also be designed with materials to comfort the foot and absorb shock.

Listed below are tips to prevent Post-Tib Tendonitis from recurring:

  • Wear shoes that provide cushioning, support and shock absorption.
  • Use orthotics with sufficient arch support that is constructed from shock absorbing, cushioning materials.
  • Vary exercise routines. The variety will keep one set of muscles from being under continuous stress.

If the problem persists, consult your foot doctor.

This information is for educational purposes ONLY. Only a qualified Doctor can make a medical recommendation for treatment or diagnosis. We do not claim that our products cure any medical condition. The foot has very complex anatomy so there can be many different reasons to explain what is causing your feet to hurt, and some problems can cause more to arise. For this reason, you should always consult a doctor for a correct diagnosis or recommendation for insoles, especially if your pain is severe, worsens, or persists, even with the aid of insoles.

Pregnancy & Feet

Sesamoiditis

Shin Splints

Toenail Fungus